Speaker

Speaker No.27-28 CIFCL-20 (Tentative) 4-8 May, 2020

Adele Goldberg is a professor of psychology, linguistics and cognitive science at Princeton University. Her interest is in the nature of our knowledge of language, and how that knowledge is learned and processed.  She is particularly interested inconstructions, learned pairings of form and function, which include words, collocations, idioms, as well as more general patterns such as the double-object and passive constructions. Goldberg is the author of Constructions: a construction grammar approach to argument structure(1995), Constructions at Work: the nature of generalization in language(2006), and most recently,Explain me This: creativity, competition and the partial productivity of constructions(2019).                        

Website: https://adele.princeton.edu    
 

Dagmar Divjak is a Professorial Research Fellow at the University of Birmingham where she holds a Chair in Cognitive Linguistics and Language Cognition. She is Editor-in-Chief of the journal Cognitive Linguistics and has co-edited De Gruyters Handbook of Cognitive Linguistics. Her main research interests are in understanding the relation between our general and individual cognitive abilities and the patterns and structures we see in language. She has worked extensively on charting what language has to offer the learner in their quest for the meaning of words and constructions and her first monograph Clustering the Lexicon was published in the series Cognitive Linguistics Research.Currently, she is working on putting usage-based theories on a cognitively sounder footing by exploring which distributional patterns learners discover in data, given existing constraints on memory and attention. A monograph on this topic Frequency in Language: Memory, Attention and Learningis forthcoming with Cambridge University Press.

For more details, please visit her web page at https://www.sheffield.ac.uk/russian/staff/profiles/divjakd/.

Speaker No. 25-26

CIFCL-19, 4th-8th Nov., 2019

       

       

Martin Hilpertis Professor of English Linguistics at the University of Neuchâtel. He holds a PhD from Rice University and he did postdoctoral research at the International Computer Science Institute in Berkeley and at the Freiburg Institute for Advanced Studies. He is interested in cognitive linguistics, language change, construction grammar, and corpus linguistics. He is the author of "Germanic Future Constructions" (2008, John Benjamins), "Constructional Change in English" (2013, Cambridge University Press), and "Construction Grammar and its Application to English (2014, Edinburgh University Press). He is editor of the journal "Functions of Language" and associate editor of "Cognitive Linguistics”.

Email: martin.hilpert@unine.ch
     

       

       

Francisco José Ruiz de Mendoza Ibáñezworks on Cognitive Linguistics, Construction Grammar(s), inferential pragmatics and functional approaches to language. He has coordinated funded work on figurative language from scholars across Europe, many of them part of the Lexicom research group, which he co-founded (www.lexicom.es). He has published extensively on metaphor, metonymy, illocution, and has created, with professor Ricardo Mairal, the Lexical Constructional Model. He has edited or co-edited several books:Cognitive Linguistics: Internal Dynamics and Interdisciplinary Interaction (2005, Mouton),Cognitive Linguistics: Current Applications and Future Perspectives (2006, Mouton), Defining Metonymy in Cognitive Linguistics: Towards a Consensus View (2011, John Benjamins),Theory and Practice in Functional-Cognitive Space (2014, John Benjamins),The Functional Perspective on Language and Discourse: Applications and Implications (2014, John Benjamins). He has authored or coauthored several books on linguistic theory, the most recent one being Cognitive Modeling. A Linguistic Perspective (2014, John Benjamins), which received the 2015 AESLA Research Award for experienced researchers. He serves or has served on the editorial and scientific boards of journals such as Miscelánea, Jezikoslovlje, ITL-International Journal of Applied Linguistics, Revue Romane, and Cognitive Linguistics. Former editor of the Spanish Journal of Applied Linguistics, he has been the editor of the Review of Cognitive Linguistics, and co-editor of Applications of Cognitive Linguistics (Mouton de Gruyter) since their inception. Since January 2012 he has been co-editor of the Bibliography of Metaphor and Metonymy (John Benjamins). He also serves on the editorial board of book series, such as Human Cognitive Processing (John Benjamins, since 2010), Metaphor in Language, Cognition, and Communication (John Benjamins, since 2010), and Figurative Thought and Language (John Benjamins, since 2015). He has been the head organizer of two major international conferences: 8th International Cognitive Linguistics Conference (University of La Rioja, 2003); 44th International Meeting of the Societas Linguistica Europaea (University of La Rioja, 2011) and several other conferences and seminars.
Email:
francisco.ruizdemendoza@unirioja.es    

Speaker No. 23-24

CIFCL-18, 8th-12th Oct., 2018

     

     

     

Arie Verhagen(PhD 1986) is presently professor of Language, Culture, and Cognition at Leiden University (The Netherlands), and Academic Director of the Honors Program of the Faculty of Arts in Leiden. He previously held positions at the Free University in Amsterdam and the University of Utrecht. From 1996 till 2004, he served as editor-in-chief of the journalCognitive Linguistics. His grammatical work includes studies on word order, passive, causative, connectives,wh-questions, complementation, and other construction types. With his 2005 monographConstructions of Intersubjectivity. Discourse, Syntax, and Cognition(Oxford University Press), he contributed to the so-called ‘social turn’ in cognitive linguistics. He has been a (co)supervisor in a number of externally funded interdisciplinary projects, on topics such as comparing cultural evolution in human language and bird song, computational modeling of language acquisition and language change, stylistics and rhetoric in literature and non-fiction, and dialogues in past and present communication. His research is framed in a (radically) usage-based approach (seeGeeraerts 2016for a recent overview), and focuses especially on the connection between grammar, discourse, and the highly developed human ability to understand other minds, as a basis for cooperation; a recent result is the volumeViewpoint and the Fabric of Meaning(De Gruyter, 2016, co-edited with Barbara Dancygier and Wei-lun Lu).

Website:http://www.arieverhagen.nl/

Email: A.Verhagen@hum.leidenuniv.nl

Stefan Th. Griesearned his M.A. and Ph.D. degrees at the University of Hamburg in 1998 and 2000 and is currently (Full) Professor of Linguistics in the Department of Linguistics at the University of California, Santa Barbara (UCSB) as well as a part-time (Full/W3-) Professor of Corpus Linguistics (Quantitative Methods) of the Justus-Liebig-Universität Giessen. Methodologically, Gries is a quantitative corpus linguist at the intersection of corpus linguistics, cognitive linguistics, and computational linguistics, who uses statistical methods to investigate linguistic phenomena (corpus-linguistically and experimentally) and test and develop corpus-linguistic and statistical methods. Theoretically, he is a cognitively-oriented usage-based linguist. Gries has authored three books, co-edited seven volumes, and has (co-)authored dozens of articles, many in the leading peer-reviewed journals of his fields (Cognitive Linguistics and International Journal of Corpus Linguistics). He is general editor of the international peer-reviewed journal Corpus Linguistics and Linguistic Theory, co-editor-in-chief of the Journal of Research Design and Statistics in Linguistics and Communication, associate editor of Cognitive Linguistic Studies, and performs editorial functions for about a dozen other international peer-reviewed journals and book series.

E-mail:stgries@linguistics.ucsb.edu

Speaker No. 22

CIFCL-17, 25th-29thDec., 2017

Jeffrey M. Zacksis Professor and Associate Chair of Psychological & Brain Sciences, and Professor of Radiology, at Washington University in Saint Louis. He received his bachelor’s degree in Cognitive Science from Yale University and his PhD in Cognitive Psychology from Stanford University in 1999. His research has been funded by the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency, the National Science Foundation, the National Institutes of Health, and the James S. McDonnell Foundation.

He has served as Associate Editor of the journals Cognition, Cognitive Research: Principles & Implications, and Collabra, and as Chair of the governing board of the Psychonomic Society, the leading association of experimental psychologists. He is the recipient of scientific awards from the American Psychological Association and the American Psychological Foundation, and is a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, the Association for Psychological Science, the Midwest Psychological Association, and the Society of Experimental Psychologists.

Zacks is the author of two books,Flicker: Your Brain on MoviesandEvent Cognition(with G.A. Radvansky), and co-editor ofUnderstanding Events(with Thomas F. Shipley). He has published more than 80 journal articles and also has written forSalon,Aeon, andThe New York Times.

E-mail:jzacks@wustl.edu

Speaker No. 21

CIFCL-16, 28thNov-2ndDec., 2016

     

     

Cliff Goddard

Cliff Goddardis Professor of Linguistics at Griffith University, Australia. He is a leading proponent of the Natural Semantic Metalanguage (NSM) approach to language, meaning, and culture, originated by Anna Wierzbicka. He has published extensively on topics in descriptive and theoretical semantics, ethnopragmatics, language description, and linguistic typology. His major publications include the edited volumesEthnopragmatics(2006, Mouton de Gruyter),Cross-Linguistic Semantics(2008, Benjamins), and“Happiness” and “Pain” Across Languages and Cultures, co-edited with Zhengdao Ye (in press, Benjamins). He is the author of two textbooksSemantic Analysis(2nd ed., 2011, OUP) andThe Languages of East and Southeast Asia (2005, OUP). His most recent book isWords and Meanings: Lexical Semantics Across Domains, Languages and Cultures, co-authored with Anna Wierzbicka (2014, OUP). Professor Goddard is a Fellow of the Australian Academy of the Humanities.

Email: <c.goddard@griffith.edu.au>

Speaker No. 20

CIFCL-15, 23rd-27thMay, 2016

     

     

Nikolas Gisborne

Nikolas Gisborneis the Professor of Linguistics at the University of Edinburgh, where he has worked since 2002. Before moving to Edinburgh, he taught at the University of Hong Kong and the University of Cambridge, having graduated with a PhD in Linguistics from University College London. Gisborne works on syntax and semantics, particularly event structure and predication, and on language change. He works with a networkbased theory of language and cognitive structure, and is interested in the theoretical question of how to model a formal theory of language so that it is cognitively and psychologically plausible.

E-mail:n.gisborne@ed.ac.uk

Speaker No. 19

CIFCL-14, 13th-17thOct., 2014

Phillip Wolff

Phillip Wolffreceived his PhD from Northwestern University and is currently Associate Professor of Psychology and Interim Director of the Program in Linguistics. Dr. Wolff’s research focuses on the representation of relational concepts and on the language-thought interface. He has conducted research on the semantics of verbs and prepositions and their relationship to the nonlinguistic conceptual system, with special emphasis on the large-scale structure of the verb lexicon and on the role of forces in the representation of causal expressions. Dr. Wolff’s research involves a range of methodologies, including those from psychophysics, computational linguistics, computer visualization, and cross-linguistic comparisons.

E-mail:pwolff@emory.edu

Speaker No. 18

CIFCL-13, 5th-9thNov., 2013

Ronald Langacker

Ronald W. Langackerreceived his Ph.D. in Linguistics from the University of Illinois in 1966. He was a professor in the Department of Linguistics at the University of California, San Diego from that time until his retirement in 2003. During this period, 31 graduate students received their Ph.D. under his supervision, and 48 Visiting Scholars spent time at UCSD under his sponsorship. He now holds the position of Research Professor.After his training and early research in generative syntactic theory, Langacker largely devoted the first ten years of his professional career to the comparative grammar and historical reconstruction of the Uto-Aztecan family of Native American languages.

In 1976, deciding that a radically different theoretical approach to language was necessary; he began developing the framework that has come to be known as “cognitive grammar”. A fundamental statement of that framework, the two volume work titledFoundations of Cognitive Grammar, was published in 1987 and 1991. Through the years, cognitive grammar has continued to be refined, further articulated, and applied to a progressively wider range of languages and phenomena. An interim summary,Cognitive Grammar: A Basic Introduction, appeared in 2008.Langacker is a founding member of the International Cognitive Linguistics Association and served as its president from 1997-99. He was chair of the organizing committee for the 2001 International Cognitive Linguistics Conference. He was a co-editor (and is now an honorary editor) of the monograph seriesCognitive Linguistics Research, and serves as a member of numerous editorial and advisory boards. He has published other books and many articles dealing with a broad array of issues in cognitive linguistics. He is known as one of the three founding fathers of Cognitive Linguistics.

E-mail:rlangacker@ucsd.edu

Speaker No. 16-17

CIFCL-12, 27th-31stMay, 2013

Alan Cienki

Alan Cienkiis Associate Professor in the English section of the Department of Language and Communication at the Vrije Universiteit (VU) in Amsterdam, Netherlands. One of his major research interests is how speech and gesture reflect processes of conceptualization. He is co-editor of the volumesConceptual and Discourse Factors in Linguistic Structure(2001) andMetaphor and Gesture(2008). His education in the USA included receiving a BA from Hamilton College in Russian Studies, and an MA and PhD in Slavic linguistics from Brown University. He then taught at Emory University (USA) in the Dept. of Russian and East Asian Languages and Cultures. At Emory University he co-founded and later directed the Program in Linguistics, and also served as the Director of thePhD program in Culture, History, and Theory of the interdisciplinary Graduate Institute of the Liberal Arts. He is Chair of the international Association for Researching and Applying Metaphor (RaAM), Associate Editor of the journalCognitive Linguistics, and founder of the Amsterdam Gesture Center.http://www.let.vu.nl/staf/a.cienki

E-mail:a.cienki@vu.nl

     

     

Stefan Th. Gries

Stefan Th. Griesearned his M.A. and Ph.D. degrees at the University of Hamburg in 1998 and 2000 and is currently (Full) Professor of Linguistics in the Department of Linguistics at the University of California, Santa Barbara (UCSB) and Honorary Liebig-Professor of the Justus-Liebig-Universität Giessen. Methodologically, Gries is a quantitative corpus linguist at the intersection of corpus linguistics, cognitive linguistics, and computational linguistics, who uses statistical methods to investigate linguistic phenomena (corpus-linguistically and experimentally) and test and develop corpus-linguistic and statistical methods. Theoretically, he is a cognitively-oriented usage-based linguist. Gries has authored three books, co-edited six volumes, and has(co-)authored articles in the leading peer-reviewed journals of his fields (Cognitive Linguistics and International Journal of Corpus Linguistics) and many other peer-reviewed journals. He is founding editor-in-chief of the international peer-reviewed journal Corpus Linguistics and Linguistic Theory, associate editor of Cognitive Linguistics, and performs editorial functions for many international peer-reviewed journals and book series.

E-mail:stgries@linguistics.ucsb.edu

Speaker No. 15

CIFCL-11, Oct., 2012

     

     

Sherman Wilcox

Sherman Wilcoxis Professor of Linguistics at the University of New Mexico. Dr. Wilcox specializes in the relation between gesture and language, the evolution of language, cognitive approaches to sign linguistics, and interpreting theory. His research includes studies of American Sign Language, Catalan Sign Language, and Italian Sign Language, and Saudi Sign Language. He is currently writing a book,Setting Language in Motion, to be published by Oxford University Press.

E-mail:wilcox@unm.edu

Speaker No. 14

CIFCL-10, June, 2012

     

     

Jürgen Bohnemeyer

Jürgen Bohnemeyeris Associate Professor of Linguistics at the State University of New York at Buffalo. He studied linguistics at Bielefeld University in Germany and Tilburg University in the Netherlands, where he obtained his doctorate in 1998. He was first a postdoctoral researcher and then a senior research fellow at the Max Planck Institute for Psycholinguistics until he took up a position as Assistant Professor at the University at Buffalo in 2003. There he was tenured in 2008. Bohnemeyer specializes in semantic typology, the crosslinguistic study of semantic categorization. Bohnemeyer’s work focuses on the semantic typology of representations of space, time, and events.

E-mail:jb77@buffalo.edu

     

Speaker No. 12-13

CIFCL-9, 2011

     

     

Laura A Janda

Laura A. Jandareceived a bachelor’s degree in Russian at Princeton U in 1979, followed by a PhD degree in Slavic linguistics in 1984. Her education also includes applied linguistics (certification as an ESL instructor), numerous specialized language-training courses in various Slavic countries, and, more recently, statistics. She has been employed on the faculties of UCLA, the University of Rochester, the University of North Carolina (Chapel Hill), and the University of Tromsø(Norway). Janda is the recipient of numerous grants and awards, most notably from the American Council of Learned Societies, the US Dept of Education, the National Science Foundation, the Norwegian Academy of Sciences, and the Norwegian Research Council. She has over one hundred publications addressing a variety of linguistic issues pertaining to Slavic languages and cognitive linguistics.

E-mail:laura.janda@uit.no

     

     

     

Ewa Dabrowska

Ewa Dabrowskareceived her PhD from the University of Gdańsk in 1995. Since then she has taught at the universities of Gdańsk, Glasgow, Sussex, Sheffield, and, since 2009, Northumbria. She is the editor ofCognitive Linguistics, member of the Editorial Board ofTrends in Language Acquisition Research, Vice President of theUK Cognitive Linguistics Association, and a member of the Governing Board of theInternational Cognitive Linguistics Associationand theAHRC Peer Review College. Her research covers three main areas: cognitive linguistics, psycholinguistics, and language acquisition.

E-mail:ewa.dabrowska@northumbria.ac.uk

     

Speaker No. 9-11

CIFCL-8, 2010

     

     

William Croft

William Croftreceived his Ph.D. from Stanford University in 1986. He is currently Professor of Linguistics at the University of New Mexico. Croft’s areas of specialty are typology, semantics, cognitive linguistics, construction grammar and evolutionary models of language change. Croft has held visiting positions at the Max Planck Institute for Psycholinguistics, the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology and the Center for Advanced Study in the Behavioral Sciences.

E-mail:wcroft@unm.edu

     

     

     

Melissa Bowerman

Melissa Bowermanwas Senior Scientist (emeritus) at the Max Planck Institute for Psycholinguistics (Nijmegen, The Netherlands) and adjunct Professor of Linguistics (emer.) at the Free University of Amsterdam. She received her B.A. in psychology from Stanford University and her M.A. and Ph.D. in social psychology (psycholinguistics) from Harvard University. Her research focuses on first language acquisition in cross-linguistic perspective and its relationship to linguistic typology, and on the interface between semantics and cognition in adult language and in the developing child. Some more specific topics include spatial semantics, argument structure, and event representation.

     

     

Zoltán Kövecses

Zoltán Kövecsesis Professor of Linguistics in the Department of American Studies at Eötvös Loránd University, Budapest. He is currently working on the language and conceptualization of emotions, cross-cultural variation in metaphor, metaphor and metonymy in discourse, and the issue of the relationship between language, mind, and culture from a cognitive linguistic perspective.

E-mail:zkovecses@ludens.elte.hu

     

Speaker No. 7-8

CIFCL-7, 2009

     

     

Dirk Geeraerts

Dirk Geeraerts(born 1955, PhD 1981) holds the chair of theoretical linguistics at theUniversity of Leuven,Belgium. His main research interests involve the overlapping fields of lexical semantics, lexicology, and lexicography, with a theoretical focus oncognitive semantics. His involvement withcognitive linguisticsdates from the 1980s, when in his PhD thesis he was one of the first in Europe to explore the possibilities of aprototype-theoretical model of categorization. As the founder of the journalCognitive Linguisticsand as the editor (with Hubert Cuyckens) of theHandbook of Cognitive Linguistics, he played an instrumental role in the international expansion of cognitive linguistics.

E-mail:dirk.geeraerts@arts.kuleuven.be

     

     

     

Mark Turner

Mark Turner is acognitive scientist,linguist, andauthor. He is Institute Professor and Professor of Cognitive Science atCase Western Reserve University, where he was for two years Dean of the College of Arts and Sciences. He was previously Distinguished University Professor at theUniversity of Marylandand Associate Director of theCenter for Advanced Study in the Behavioral Sciences. Turner has been a fellow of theInstitute for Advanced Study, theJohn Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation, theCenter for Advanced Study in the Behavioral Sciences, theNational Humanities Center, theNational Endowment for the Humanities, and the Institute of Advanced Study atDurham University. The work ofGilles Fauconnierand Turner founded the theory ofconceptual blending.

E-mail:mark.turner@case.edu

     

Speaker No. 6

CIFCL-6, 2008

     

     

Chris Sinha

Chris Sinhais Professor of Psychology of Language. He gained his BA in Developmental Psychology at the University of Sussex and his doctorate at the University of Utrecht. Before moving to Portsmouth in September 2002, Chris taught in departments of Education, Psychology, and Language and Communication, in Britain, the Netherlands, Denmark and India. He has published widely in many disciplines, including anthropology, linguistics, education, evolutionary biology, connection science, as well as developmental and cultural psychology.

E-mail:Chris.Sinha@port.ac.uk

Speaker No. 5

CIFCL-5, 2008

     

     

Gilles Fauconnier

Gilles Fauconnier(born on August 19, 1944) is aFrenchlinguist, researcher incognitive science, andauthor, currently working in theU.S.. He is aprofessorat theUniversity of California, San Diegoin the Department of Cognitive Science. His work withMark Turnerfounded the theory ofconceptual blending.

E-mail:faucon@cogsci.ucsd.edu

     

Speaker No. 4

CIFCL-4, 2007

     

     

Leonard Talmy

Leonard Talmyis a professor oflinguisticsat theUniversity at BuffaloState University of New York. He is known for his pioneering work incognitive linguistics, more specifically, in the relationship betweensemanticand formal linguistic structures and the connections between semantic typologies and universals. He also specializes in the study ofYiddishandNative Americanlinguistics. He is known as one of the three founding fathers of Cognitive Linguistics.

E-mail:talmy@buffalo.edu

     

Speaker No. 3

CIFCL-3, 2006

     

     

Ronald Langacker

Ronald W. Langackerreceived his Ph.D. in Linguistics from the University of Illinois in 1966. He was a professor in the Department of Linguistics at the University of California, San Diego from that time until his retirement in 2003. During this period, 31 graduate students received their Ph.D. under his supervision, and 48 Visiting Scholars spent time at UCSD under his sponsorship. He now holds the position of Research Professor.After his training and early research in generative syntactic theory, Langacker largely devoted the first ten years of his professional career to the comparative grammar and historical reconstruction of the Uto-Aztecan family of Native American languages.

In 1976, deciding that a radically different theoretical approach to language was necessary; he began developing the framework that has come to be known as “cognitive grammar”. A fundamental statement of that framework, the two volume work titledFoundations of Cognitive Grammar, was published in 1987 and 1991. Through the years, cognitive grammar has continued to be refined, further articulated, and applied to a progressively wider range of languages and phenomena. An interim summary,Cognitive Grammar: A Basic Introduction, appeared in 2008.Langacker is a founding member of the International Cognitive Linguistics Association and served as its president from 1997-99. He was chair of the organizing committee for the 2001 International Cognitive Linguistics Conference. He was a co-editor (and is now an honorary editor) of the monograph seriesCognitive Linguistics Research, and serves as a member of numerous editorial and advisory boards. He has published other books and many articles dealing with a broad array of issues in cognitive linguistics. He is known as one of the three founding fathers of Cognitive Linguistics.

E-mail:rlangacker@ucsd.edu

Speaker No. 2

CIFCL-2, 2005

     

     

John Taylor

Professor of Linguistics, University of Otago, New ZealandExpertise: Phonetics and phonology, Germanic languages, Romance languages. Research: cognitive grammar, spatial relations, phonetics. John Taylor has held positions in Germany and in South Africa. Currently he is the managing editor of Cognitive Linguistics Research (Mouton de Gruyter) and is on the editorial board of the Functions of Language (John Benjamins), and of the journal Cognitive Linguistics .

E-mail:john.taylor65@xtra.co.nz

Speaker No. 1

CIFCL-1, April 2004

     

     

George Lakoff

Professor of Linguistics, University of California at Berkeley. Research interests include Cognitive linguistics, especially the neural theory of language. Conceptual systems, conceptual metaphor, syntax-semantics-pragmatics. The application of cognitive and neural linguistics to politics, literature, philosophy and mathematics.He is known as one of the three founding fathers of Cognitive Linguistics.

E-mail:lakoff@berkeley.edu

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